Becoming a Forensic?

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Becoming a Forensic?

Makenzie Clark
I am thirteen years old and I have wanted to be a CSI since I was 9. My middle school is having a career day and while taking my career test I scored a 93% in Health Science. I was so excited. I would like to find out from a real CSI (that works in the field, since that is what I plan to do) what it is like. When I become a forensic I am more interested in the Forensic Photography,  Detection and Recovery of Human Remains , Crime Scene Investigation, and someone who works in the lab, comparing figerprints, DNA, and other key evidence. It would literally be a dream to hear from a real CSI. And before you say this I know that a real CSI is nothing like the movies, or tv shows. I am just really interested in piecing together clues, and being the person to find the one responsible for hurting someone. Anyways, thank you to whoever answers this. Who made my day!
Liz
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Re: Becoming a Forensic?

Liz
Hey, I'm not a CSI, yet, but I'm going through the hiring process and should be hired by April. You are all over the map with what you wanna do, you need to focus on one part, you're not superman, you can't do everything. You either collect the evidence, or work in fingerprints, or work in DNA, or work in the lab. I am more interested in the collecting part, I love knowing that I am the one that everyone else relies on for everything. I took the pictures to show what the scene looked like, I am the one who found the fingerprints to identify who broke into the house, I am the one who found the knife used to stab the person. I have worked in fingerprints also, and it's not as much fun, but that's just me.
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Re: Becoming a Forensic?

Wilson CSI
In reply to this post by Makenzie Clark
There are very few "Gil Grissom"s in Forensics.  Most people like Liz said specialize in an area or two.  

I been working for over 10 years now.  I do Crime Scene work and Latent print work.  

In crime scene work you will have to know various skills like photograph, collection, etc... But having a working knowledge of Blood Spatter, DNA, Firearms, etc... will help you go a long way in Crime Scene work.  

I enjoy Latent print work more than crime scenes.  

Once you get into field go ahead and work toward certifcations through the IAI.  I currently hold the Senior crime scene analyst certification and will be testing on the Latent Print certification this month.  
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Re: Becoming a Forensic?

Barbara Walsh
In reply to this post by Makenzie Clark
  I admire your spirit, and the fact that at such a young age you already know where you want to go.  
  I am not a CSI, but have been to college and taken forensic classes, and many others.  You said you wanted to maybe go into Death Investigation, this was my choice the day I stepped into college.  Some of the classes/ knowledge you will need include photography and how to use a camera- not just snap a picture; anatomy and pathology; various weapons used in crime such as handguns, rifles, shotguns, knives etc, and a study of ballistics, bloodstain pattern analysis, crime scene investigation, and I could go on.
  The best place to start working on all this is the library.  If your local library does not have the books you need, see if you can get an Inter-Library Loan from another library, maybe in another state.  If you ask the librarian about ILL she should know what that is.
  If you need more info you could email me at walsh932b@hotmail,com.  It's okay, I don't bite.  I try to encourage young people to live their dreams.  My 10 year old granddaughter has been looking at my books since she was 4, and she too wants to go into Death Investigation.  NOTE: Some of the books you may request have pictures of violent crime, and can be disturbing.  I can give you some titles for some of the tamer ones.

Barb Walsh