Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

Posted by Brad Brad
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Hello, I was wondering if I could possibly talk to a person that specializes in Blood Pattern Analysis or close to that discipline.  I have a couple questions pertaining about that field.  Thanks

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Brad Brad
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Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

I would greatly apprciate any comments/facts about this field.  That would help me out a lot! Thanks!
donpenven donpenven
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Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

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Hi Brad: Here's an article I've been holding until I get a blog setup:
Blood at the Crime Scene—Part 1—How Do Crime Scene Investigators Find Blood at the Scene

Contrary to what most crime-related police TV shows and motion pictures depict—traces of blood ARE NOT located using an UltraViolet (UV) light! Why … because blood does not fluoresce! More often than not, the script calls for the use of a blue light in a darkened room. This is another fallacy because UV light is invisible, but blue light is used to complete the illusion. But it doesn’t find blood.

On the other hand, UVA light can assist in locating visible blood spots. On light colored backgrounds, any blood spots present will appear black when exposed to UVA, since blood absorbs UVA light. This will provide better photographic contrast against various backgrounds.

Of course many crime scenes have visible blood spattered all over floors, walls and even ceilings. This blood poses no problems, and the CSI will collect samples from pooled blood as well as the spatter resulting from a blood-drenched knife or baseball bat being swung through the air as repeated strikes are inflicted upon the victim.

It is very important that blood evidence be properly documented and crime scene photos should include the following:
1. Medium wide angle of the area
2. Close up with a scale and surrounding objects included
3. Detailed: Close enough to record direction of travel of blood spatters, with a scale included

In many crime scenes, the perpetrator makes an effort to “clean-up the area,” but rarely do they perform a thorough job of it. Blood on carpet or rugs is easily cleaned off the surface with soap and water. But the underside usually has some residue on it, and the blood may have seeped through to the floor under the carpet.

Even mopping up blood from solid surfaces like tile or wood floors may leave traces—invisible to the naked eye. This is where the CSI employs a chemical reagent known as Luminol. More will follow on this below.

Sometimes it is very obvious to the investigator that the material he observes is blood. But he does have the tools to confirm his hunch to a degree. Two reagents are popular means of determining the “probable, presumptive” presence of blood: Phenolphthalein and Leucomalachite.

Both of these reagents are deployed using a “contact” method of testing. A clean piece of filter paper is dampened with distilled water and is then pressed against the stain. The reagent is then applied to the filter paper, thus avoiding any chance of contaminating the stain or from interfering with subsequent DNA analysis.

Phenolphthalein is considered to be the less sensitive (1:100,000) as Leucomalachite reagent but it is the most reliable and specific. When applied to the contact filter paper it produces a pink stain, which is a positive (presumptively), for blood.

Leucomalachite is more sensitive (1:300,000), when applied to the collected stain it produces a strong blue-green color—again this is presumptive evidence of blood.

Luminol is supplied as a dry powder and must be mixed with distilled water just prior to use, since it has a limited shelf life of just a few hours before it will no longer perform its task. After mixing, the reagent is sprayed onto surfaces throughout the crime scene—on floors, walls, doors, windows and ceilings. Luminol’s sensitivity is 1:100,000.

The principal drawback with luminol is that it must be used in near-total darkness. The reaction it produces when it reacts to the iron content of blood—hemoglobin—is a bluish-white luminescence. It “glows in the dark!” The luminescence lasts for just a few minutes, but reapplying the reagent will often bring back the glow. It is not unusual to find perfectly clear shoeprints made in blood with Luminol. The resultant luminescence is easily photographed using time exposures, and then evidence samples are gathered for submission to the crime lab. Luminol does not interfere with DNA testing.

The reader must keep in mind that all three of these reagents indicate the probable presence of blood, and they do not differentiate between human or animal blood.
Brad Brad
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Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

Thanks Donpenven,

Every little information helps!  Are you intrested in becoming a Blood Pattern Analyst?  Also when you get your site up tell me, I am very intrested in it.  Thanks alot
Brad
donpenven donpenven
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RE: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

Will do Brad!

 

Don

 

Don Penven

Tech Support

Sirchie Finger Print Labs

Phone: 800-356-7311

FAX: 800-899-8181

Email: [hidden email]

 

From: Brad [via Crime Scene Investigator Forum] [mailto:ml-node+[hidden email]]
Sent: Friday, October 29, 2010 10:37 AM
To: Don Penven
Subject: Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

 

Thanks Donpenven,

Every little information helps!  Are you intrested in becoming a Blood Pattern Analyst?  Also when you get your site up tell me, I am very intrested in it.  Thanks alot
Brad


 



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Brad Brad
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Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

In reply to this post by Brad
Anybody who has a comment/information about this field please feel free to comment.
Thanks
Don Penven Don Penven
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Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

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Hi Brad: The blog went live last week. Right now the only postings have been for latent fingerprints and crime scene investigation in general. I have several articles on blood and pattern interpretation that I hope to get up before the weekend.

Thank you for your interest.

Don Penven

http://crime-scene-training.blogspot.com
Shannon Marie Shannon Marie
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Hi Don,
I visited your site. I look forward to seeing more articles from you in the future. I tried to sign up specifically for your site, but was rerouted to a http://www.sirchie.com/about/news.html site. I did sign up there, however will you be completing your site any time soon? Thanks,
Shannon Marie
donpenven donpenven
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RE: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

Shannon Marie: Thank you for responding. Sirchie will be administering the mailing list so I can keep folks up to date on the blog. I have several great articles on blood and blood spatter that I am working on this week. I hope to have then posted in a few days. I’ll keep you up to speed.

 

All the best,

 

Don

 

Don Penven

Tech Support

Sirchie Finger Print Labs

Phone: 800-356-7311

FAX: 800-899-8181

Email: [hidden email]

Blog: http://crime-scene-training.blogspot.com

 

From: Shannon Marie [via Crime Scene Investigator Forum] [mailto:ml-node+[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 2010 9:24 PM
To: Don Penven
Subject: Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

 

Hi Don,
I visited your site. I look forward to seeing more articles from you in the future. I tried to sign up specifically for your site, but was rerouted to a http://www.sirchie.com/about/news.html site. I did sign up there, however will you be completing your site any time soon? Thanks,
Shannon Marie




The information transmitted is intended only for the person to whom or entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or privileged material. Any review, retransmission, dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this information by persons or entities other than the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient, is prohibited. If you received this in error, please contact the sender and then delete and destroy all copies of the material. Thank you.
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Brad Brad
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Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

In reply to this post by Shannon Marie
This message is for Don,

Hey I checked out your blog and it is getting a long really good.  If you need any factual information about blood pattern analysis, I can send you some.  I purchased the text book called "Principles of Bloodstain Pattern Analysis: Theory and Practice" this previous summer.  I had to do a book report for an English class about it.  So I did an outline.  If you are intrested at all, just give me an email me back saying so. Thanks

Brad
Shannon Marie Shannon Marie
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RE: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

In reply to this post by donpenven
Thanks Don,
I look forward to reading more. I appreciate your response.
Shannon Marie
donpenven donpenven
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RE: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

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Thanks Brat for replying. I am interested in seeing what you have. We have to be careful about copyrights, however.

 

I just posted two blood spatter articles and will we working on the blog intermittently. So if you get an error message try back later.

 

Best regards,

 

Don

 

Don Penven

Tech Support

Sirchie Finger Print Labs

Phone: 800-356-7311

FAX: 800-899-8181

Email: [hidden email]

Blog: http://crime-scene-training.blogspot.com

 

From: Brad [via Crime Scene Investigator Forum] [mailto:ml-node+[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 12:01 AM
To: Don Penven
Subject: Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

 

This message is for Don,

Hey I checked out your blog and it is getting a long really good.  If you need any factual information about blood pattern analysis, I can send you some.  I purchased the text book called "Principles of Bloodstain Pattern Analysis: Theory and Practice" this previous summer.  I had to do a book report for an English class about it.  So I did an outline.  If you are intrested at all, just give me an email me back saying so. Thanks

Brad




The information transmitted is intended only for the person to whom or entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or privileged material. Any review, retransmission, dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this information by persons or entities other than the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient, is prohibited. If you received this in error, please contact the sender and then delete and destroy all copies of the material. Thank you.
________________________________________

donpenven donpenven
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RE: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

In reply to this post by Shannon Marie

Hi Shannon: I just posted two blood spatter articles, and I will be working on other parts of the blog today. If you get an error message just try back in a while. I have a really super PowerPoint and will try to figure out a way to post it. I guess the simplest way is to just put a link on the blog. It is an 11 meg file so it takes a bit to download it.

 

Regards,

 

Don

 

Don Penven

Tech Support

Sirchie Finger Print Labs

Phone: 800-356-7311

FAX: 800-899-8181

Email: [hidden email]

Blog: http://crime-scene-training.blogspot.com

 

From: Shannon Marie [via Crime Scene Investigator Forum] [mailto:ml-node+[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, December 07, 2010 2:39 AM
To: Don Penven
Subject: RE: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

 

Thanks Don,
I look forward to reading more. I appreciate your response.
Shannon Marie




The information transmitted is intended only for the person to whom or entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or privileged material. Any review, retransmission, dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this information by persons or entities other than the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient, is prohibited. If you received this in error, please contact the sender and then delete and destroy all copies of the material. Thank you.
________________________________________

Don Penven Don Penven
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Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

In reply to this post by Brad
Hi Brad:
I just posted two blood spatter articles and have more to come. I also came across one of the best tutorials (PowerPoint) I have seen to date and will post a link and other info later this week.

Don
Brad Brad
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Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

Hello,

Don I was wondering what your email is.  I would rather send it to you as an attachment and have you look it over and see if you want it on your blog.  It is a rough outline of that textbook.  If you want to use it, you can. But yet again. Like you said, we have to be carefull on copyrights.
donpenven donpenven
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RE: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

Brad: Email is [hidden email]

 

Regards,

 

Don Penven

Tech Support

Sirchie Finger Print Labs

Phone: 800-356-7311

FAX: 800-899-8181

Email: [hidden email]

Blog: http://crime-scene-training.blogspot.com

 

From: Brad [via Crime Scene Investigator Forum] [mailto:ml-node+[hidden email]]
Sent: Friday, December 10, 2010 9:44 PM
To: Don Penven
Subject: Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

 

Hello,

Don I was wondering what your email is.  I would rather send it to you as an attachment and have you look it over and see if you want it on your blog.  It is a rough outline of that textbook.  If you want to use it, you can. But yet again. Like you said, we have to be carefull on copyrights.




The information transmitted is intended only for the person to whom or entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or privileged material. Any review, retransmission, dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this information by persons or entities other than the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient, is prohibited. If you received this in error, please contact the sender and then delete and destroy all copies of the material. Thank you.
________________________________________

Brad W Brad W
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Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

In reply to this post by Brad
Yea, you should have got the email.  If you have any questions just let me know.

Brad
donpenven donpenven
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RE: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

Got it Brad! Many thanks.

 

Don

 

Don Penven

Tech Support

Sirchie Finger Print Labs

Phone: 800-356-7311

FAX: 800-899-8181

Email: [hidden email]

Blog: http://crime-scene-training.blogspot.com

 

From: Brad W [via Crime Scene Investigator Forum] [mailto:ml-node+[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 11:31 PM
To: Don Penven
Subject: Re: Being a Blood Pattern Analyst

 

Yea, you should have got the email.  If you have any questions just let me know.

Brad




The information transmitted is intended only for the person to whom or entity to which it is addressed and may contain confidential and/or privileged material. Any review, retransmission, dissemination or other use of, or taking of any action in reliance upon, this information by persons or entities other than the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient, is prohibited. If you received this in error, please contact the sender and then delete and destroy all copies of the material. Thank you.
________________________________________