Interested in Persuing

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Interested in Persuing

Lakesha D.
Since I was younger, I always would watch marathon's upon marthon's of CSI. I graduated high school and decided that  was exactly what I wanted to do. I'm currently out of college but would love to get back into it. My only question is, if I wanted to pursue going to school for CSI , and got my bachelors degree in Forensics Science, what other doors could that open for me? As far as possible IT or even working as an laboratory analyst. I know I wanted to CSI, but I do not want to be limited to one career field.
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Re: Interested in Persuing

Paris Tommie
Hello Lakesha,

I noticed that you stated that you wanted to got to school for "CSI". Jobs in the forensic science field are unlike the popular tv shows you may have seen. Forensics and CSI consists of many different occupations. Detectives, crime scene technicians, and forensic analysts all contribute to the positions on popular forensic tv shows. If you want to actually go to try to "solve" the crime, then you're interested in becoming a detective. Detective are sworn police officers that investigate crimes and arrest suspects. If you're interested in going to crime scenes,  looking for and collecting evidence then you're interested in becoming a crime scene technician or a forensic technician.  If you're interested in becoming some who tests DNA, firearms evidence, trace evidence, drugs or fingerprints then you're interested in becoming a forensic analyst. There are many types of forensic analysts which include: DNA, Firearms, Chemistry, Biology, and Latent prints.

In order to become a detective, you would first need to apply for a police academy, work a few years as an officer and then follow the procedure to become a detective.

In order to become a crime scene technician, most departments require at least an associates degree. However, if you're interested in working for a big city then it's best that you get a bachelor's degree due to competitive nature of the job.

In order to become a forensic analyst you must have a strong science background. Many jobs prefer a biology or a chemistry major, however depending on the program, a forensic science degree could be sufficient.

My advice is that you do more research on which position you're interested in and find an internship in that field. Forensics is a competitive field, therefore you should be sure to keep good grades, get experience (through an internship), and find a mentor to help guide you.

Good luck!