Job Hunting

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Liz
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Job Hunting

Liz
My name is Liz. I am 23 years old and about to be a college graduate! I have attended my school since August 2008, and am finally about to enter the real world! I have been taking classes toward a Bachelor's of Technology in Criminal Investigations. The classes have included, forensic science, investigative chemistry, latent fingerprints and impressions, interviews and interrogations, crime scene investigations, and investigations of homicides. These classes were all very hands on, and in depth. I am currently in my last semester, which is a 600 hour internship with an actual Crime Scene Unit. I am in the process of looking for and applying for jobs. My one question is how do I get hired? All the responses I have gotten go a little something like this, "While I commend your education background, we require a certain amount of field time experience."
How do I get the experience if I can't get hired?!
Anyone have any advice?
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Re: Job Hunting

crimefighter
Well I Liz. Don't get dis-heart but these internship you are talking about, well these are your experience in this field. Take it from me, it is really frustrating to get a real time job in crime investigation field but you seem to have a nice Bachelors degree and these small internships, if you continue to work on them, very soon you will get a real job too. Meanwhile register yourself on any job website that keep you updated about what is going on in the job world so that if any good job come up you can submit your resume there.
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Re: Job Hunting

Wally Lind
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Submit your resume to any unit you want to work for. When I got my first cop job, I sent out 200 resumes. I got lots of tests and interviews, and ended up with five job offers. Experience can be gained by volunteering, but it's hard to find a crime scene shop where volunteers do more than hold the dumb end of the tape. Still you learn things, and it cuts down on your training site. When you get interviews, take some time to learn about the jurisdiction that's hiring. Always ask questions, during the interview (not about pay-you can ask HR about that). Crime Scene Investigator, and other websites, have job listings, but looking over city, county, and state websites can be useful. Don't forget your state crime bureau or state police websites. Those are the best jobs in the field. You can also work your way from crime scene into investigations there.
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Re: Job Hunting

louiemarques
In reply to this post by Liz