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Re: forensic photography

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Re: forensic photography

DennisD
For those of you already in the field, what camera do you use? I use a Nikon D200, GREAT camera!  I play with the camera on the weekends to improve the quality of my photos due to the camera being SO blasted complicated LOL!
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Re: Camera Equipment

Steve Staggs
Administrator

My digital photography kit includes:

  • Camera: Nikon D200
  • Primary lens: AF-S Nikkor 17-55mm 2.8 G ED
  • Marco lens: AF Micro Nikkor 60mm 2.8 D
  • Flash: Nikon Speedlight SB-800
  • Remote flash cord (for oblique lighting of evidence): Nikon SC-17
  • Close-up flash system: Nikon R1 Close-up Speedlight Remote Kit (two SB-R200 remote speedlights)
  • Locking cable release (for night photography): Nikon MC-20
  • Supplemental light meter (for low-light and night photography): Sekonic Dualmaster L-558

When I'm using 35mm film I use a Nikon F100 with 50mm, 28mm and 55mm Macro lenses.

NOTE: For information on crime scene and evidence photography see the Crime Scene and Evidence Photography page on this website.

DennisD wrote
For those of you already in the field, what camera do you use? ...
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Crime Scene Investigator Network
http://www.crime-scene-investigator.net
D7
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Re: forensic photography

D7
In reply to this post by DennisD
My unit primarily uses 4 Nikon D70s.  We have a D200 that they don't want used on scenes....not really sure of the rational there.  The D70s have done a great job over the last few years without being overly complicated.  
D7
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Crime Scene Documentation

D7
In reply to this post by DennisD
I was wondering if anyone out there is using any computer programs (that they REALLY like) to make your crime scene sketches either to scale or not.  If so what are some user friendly programs out there.
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Re: Crime Scene Documentation

CSI Guy
     D7,
I use the "CRIME ZONE" sketch program for all my scene sketches. Our Dept. has recently upgraded to "CRIME ZONE 8", although I have'nt had enough down time to get familiar with it. (It now has a 3-D section).
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Re: forensic photography

kphllps
In reply to this post by DennisD
Agency provided equipment includes:
Canon 30D w/17-85mm IS zoom
2 Canon 580EX/580EX II flashes
Canon Off-Shoe Cord II

kept in vehicle are Canon 50mm Macro and Sigma 10-20mm, additional slave flashes and lightstands.

Also have Nikon D70s w/18-70mm, converted to UV/IR by LifePixel (www.lifepixel.com)
Fuji S5Pro with nikkor 14mm as part of Deltasphere 3D scanner

Orbit monorail 4x5 which hasn't been used in probably 10 years... (G)
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Re: forensic photography

mark
hi guys

unfortunately my forensic services department in Sydney (Australia) is still in the dark ages and we are still using wet film! (hard to believe I know). no money and legal issues over storage of the digital images is the govt's excuse. Anyway, we currently have Nikon F80's, 90's, and I normally use a F100 (with Metz flash, 60mm and 28-120mm lenses). Not bad cameras ( wasn't so long ago I  was doing examinations with a F3!. Always a lucky dip when the prints come back from the photo lab. Our police service has already bought over 100 Nikon D300 kits ready for the changeover but we cannot touch them until the image storage issue is sorted.

Mark
(crime scene police officer)          
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Re: forensic photography

CHuldie
Mark, you should view the Home office guidelines for digital imagining and storage, I work for a UK force and the guidelines and advice are very easy to understand and implement.  it seems daft to reinvent the wheel, utilise something that is already in existence and modify it if required.  If you want further info mail me on Geordie941@hotmail.com
Craig
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Re: forensic photography

Charlize
In reply to this post by DennisD
I work for a portable microscope company and specialize for Forensics industry. Illumination is the key factors for taking good detailed pictures and we have applied few patent for our products.  If you are looking for cameras which could take crime scene fingerprint, fiber and tool mark pictures, you could check the link below.

http://www.x-loupe.com/prdMGP4E-func.html
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Re: Camera Equipment

kwangins
In reply to this post by Steve Staggs


  Thanks you

For the information, is very interesting.

Good camera.
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Re: Crime Scene Documentation

Dave
In reply to this post by D7
We like "Crime Zone 8"
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Re: forensic photography

mppd464
In reply to this post by DennisD
Our main camera's are Nikon D3000 or D3100's (4 total) with the kit 18-55mm VR lens and backups are Nikon D70's (4) with the standard kit lens.  I also use a 55-300mm VR lens with my D3100 as well as a Nikon SB600 flash.  I have used this setup for 2 years and love it.  I have an assortment of filters to use for varying circumstances as well.  

FYI, a polarizing filter if used correctly can help to see where someone has touched on a dusty dash when the sun is very bright.  Just turn the ring until the dust becomes visible and you have a generic idea of where to look for prints.  The same goes for a pair of polarized sunglasses, just looks funny when you are turning head sideways to look for the prints.  

We all carry backup batteries and memory card just in case.
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Re: forensic photography

mppd464
Forgot to mention that I have been using Google Sketchup for diagrams.  It takes a little getting used to and some practice (many videos are avaliable online to help you), it can be drawn to scale or not to scale and best of all, it is free!

Looks good and works great.  "Just Google it" to find out more.
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